16- Piya Vagga

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Chapter 16


Affection
(Text and Translation by Ven. Nàrada)

 

1. Ayoge yu¤jam attàna§ Þ
yogasmi¤ ca ayojaya§
Attha§ hitvà piyaggàhã Þ
pihet’ attànuyogina§. 209.
2. Mà piyehi samàga¤chi Þ
appiyehi kudàcana§
Piyàna§ adassana§ dukkha§ Þ
appiyàna¤ ca dassana§. 210.
3. Tasmà piya§ na kayiràtha Þ
piyƒpàyo hi pàpako
Ganthà tesa§ na vijjanti Þ
yesa§ natthi piyƒppiya§. 211.

 

AVOID THAT WHICH SHOULD BE SHUNNED

1. Applying oneself 1 to that which should be avoided, not applying oneself to that which should be pursued, 2 and giving up the quest, 3 one who goes after pleasure envies them who exert themselves. 4 209.

GIVE UP BOTH WHAT IS DEAR AND NOT DEAR

2. Consort not with those that are dear, 5 never with those that are not dear; not seeing those that are dear and seeing those that are not dear, are both painful. 6 210.

HOLD NOTHING DEAR

3. Hence hold nothing dear, for separation from those that are dear is bad; bonds do not exist or those to whom naught is dear or not dear. 211.

Story

    A youth, beloved by his parents, entered the Order without their approval. Later, the parents also entered the Order. Yet they could not live separated from one another, and could not give up their affection. Hearing their story, the Buddha uttered these verses.


 

4. Piyato jàyati soko Þ
piyato jàyati bhaya§
Piyato vippamuttassa Þ
natthi soko kuto bhaya§. 212.

 

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM WHAT IS DEAR

4. From endearment springs grief, from endearment springs fear; for him who is wholly free from endearment there is no grief, much less fear. 212.

Story

    A father was grieving over the death of his son. The Buddha visited him and consoled him, reciting this verse.


 

5. Pemato jàyati soko Þ
pemato jàyati bhaya§
Pemato vippamuttassa Þ
natthi soko kuto bhaya§. 213.

 

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM AFFECTION

5. From affection springs grief, from affection springs fear; for him who is wholly free from affection there is no grief, much less fear. 213.

Story

    Visàkhà lost a beloved grand-daughter. When she visited the monastery the Buddha consoled her, reciting this verse.


 

6. Ratiyà jàyati soko Þ
ratiyà jàyati bhaya§
Ratiyà vippamuttassa Þ
natthi soko kuto bhaya§. 214.

 

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM ATTACHMENT

6. From attachment springs grief, from attachment springs fear; for him who is wholly free from attachment there is no grief, much less fear. 214.

Story

    Some princes becoming jealous of one another, fell to fighting over a courtesan. The Buddha spoke on the evil consequences of attachment.


 

7. Kàmato jàyati soko Þ
kàmato jàyati bhaya§
Kàmato vippamuttassa Þ
natthi soko kuto bhaya§. 215.

 

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM LUST

7. From lust springs grief, from lust springs fear; for him who is wholly free from lust there is no grief, much less fear. 215.

Story

    A misogynistic prince later fell in love with his beautiful bride-elect, whom he had not yet seen. As she was being brought to be given in marriage to the prince, she died unexpectedly. The prince was overcome with grief. Consoling him, the Buddha uttered this verse.


 

8. Taõhàya jàyati soko Þ
taõhàya jàyati bhaya§
Taõhàya vippamuttassa Þ
natthi soko kuto bhaya§. 216.

 

GRIEF SPRINGS FROM CRAVING

8. From craving springs grief, from craving springs fear; for him who is wholly free from craving there is no grief, much less fear. 216.

Story

    A brahmin ploughed his field and told the Buddha who visited him daily, that he would share the harvest with the Buddha. Unfortunately an unexpected storm destroyed the crop and the brahmin was sorry that he could not keep his promise. The Buddha visited him and consoling him, spoke on the nature of craving.


 

9. Sãladassanasampanna§ Þ
dhammaññha§ saccavedina§
Attano kammakubbàna§ Þ
ta§ jano kurute piya§. 217.

 

THE VIRTUOUS ARE DEAR TO ALL

9. Whoso is perfect in virtue, 7 and insight, 8 is established in the Dhamma, 9 has realized the Truths, 10 and fulfils his own duties 11 – him do folk hold dear. 217.

Story

    Some youths carrying cakes went past the Buddha and the Sangha, making no offering to them. In the rear they saw the Venerable Kassapa. Taking a liking to him, they offered him some cakes. The Venerable Kassapa advised them to offer some to the Buddha and the Sangha, who were sitting by the wayside. The monks were indignant, remarking that it was favouritism. Thereupon the Buddha declared that the Venerable Kassapa was dear even to the gods and uttered this verse.


 

10. Chandajàto anakkhàte Þ
manasà ca phuño siyà
Kàmesu ca appañibaddhacitto Þ
uddha§soto’ti vuccati. 218.

 

THE NON-ATTACHED GO UPSTREAM

10. He who has developed a wish for the Undeclared 12 (Nibbàna), he whose mind is thrilled (with the three Fruits 13), he whose mind is not bound by material pleasures, such a person is called an “Upstream-bound One”. 14 218.

Story

Some pupils inquired of their preceptor, who had attained Anàgàmi (Never-Returner), whether he had attained any stage of Sainthood. The preceptor did not answer the question as even lay followers could become Anàgàmis. He waited until he would attain Arahantship. Unfortunately he died and was reborn in a Pure Abode (Suddhàvàsa) where never-Returners seek birth until they attain Arahantship. The pupils went to the Buddha weeping. The Buddha remarked that death was inevitable. They replied that they were sorry as the preceptor had died without answering their question. Thereupon the Buddha uttered this verse.


 

11. Cirappavàsi§ purisa§ Þ
dårato sotthim àgata§
¥àtimittà suhajjà ca Þ
abhinandanti sàgata§. 219.
12. Tath’ eva katapu¤¤am pi Þ
asmà lokà para§ gata§
Pu¤¤àni patigaõhanti Þ
piya§ ¤àtiü’ va àgata§. 220.

 

MERIT WELCOMES THE DOERS OF GOOD

11. A man long absent and returned safe from afar, his kinsmen, friends, and well-wishers welcome on his arrival. 219.

12. Likewise, his good deeds will receive the well-doer who has gone from this world to the next, as kinsmen will receive a dear one on his return. 220.

Story

    A devout and wealthy person performed many good deeds. A place in a celestial plane was ready to receive him even before his death. The Buddha uttered these verses, commenting an his good deeds and his future state.


End Notes

1 That is, frequenting places undesirable for bhikkhus.

2 That is, right attention (yoniso manasikàra).

3 The practice of higher Morality, Concentration, and Insight.

4 The bhikkhu with no right discrimination, gives up his quest and being attached to sensual pleasures, returns to lay life. Later, he sees successful bhikkhus and envies them.

5 Applicable to both animate and inanimate objects, pleasant persons or things.

6 Attachment in one case and aversion in the other.

7 Four kinds of morality.

8 Connected with the supramundane Paths and Fruits.

9 Nine supramundane states. See note on v. 115.

10 Saccavedina§, “speaketh truth” (Mrs. Rhys Davids). The four Noble Truths are implied here.

11 The three modes of discipline, Morality (Sãla), Concentration (Samàdhi), and Wisdom (Pa¤¤à).

12 Anakkhàta – Nibbàna. It is so called because it should not be said that Nibbàna was created by any or that it is of some such hue as blue, etc. (Commentary).

13 The first three stages of Sainthood. SotàpattiSakadàgàmi, and Anàgàmi.

14 The reference is to the Anàgàmis (Never-Returners) who, after death, are born in the Pure Abodes. They are not born in the sense-sphere as they have eradicated sense-desires.

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